Gambo Ali, a resident of Madagali community, who is a widow and has five children, was a petty trader before the Caritas Nigeria intervention but her business was not yielding much revenue. After the demise of her husband, life became really difficult for her, as feeding her children and sustaining the family on her petty trading business, was a huge challenge for her.
Kelly Auwal, is a mother of three children, from Wuro Patuji community of Mubi North Adamawa. She is a member of the Alheri Savings and Internal Lending Communities (SILC) group, who benefited from the financial literacy training aimed at supporting Income Generating Activities (IGA) of the beneficiaries.
Saratu Thomas is another beneficiary of the Savings and Internal Lending Communities (SILC), from Watu community in Michika Local Government Area of Adamawa State. Saratu suffers from psychological trauma, resulting from the Boko Haram attacks in her village, which led to the loss of the livelihoods of her family and all they owned.
Prior to her displacement, Martina lived in Gwoza with her household, where she traded in fresh vegetables. Upon relocating to Damare in Yola North Local Government Area, she and her household struggled to feed since they had no means of livelihood. Their attempt at farming was thwarted by flood and herdsmen attacks.
Sarah Philip sold grain in Madagali town of Adamawa State, where she lived with her husband. Life dealt her a bad hand when insurgency hit her community, claiming the life of her husband and her livelihood.
Dinatu Dauda once lived in Gwoza, Borno State with her husband, who was a small-scale farmer. Prior to the invasion of their community by Boko Haram insurgents, she eked a living from farm produce sales in a make-shift stall in front of her residence.
Savings and Internal Lending Communities (SILC), is a key component of the Caritas Nigeria sustainable livelihood strategy, which encourages households to cultivate the culture of saving, even from the little resources that they make as proceeds from their businesses. The SILC methodology is a holistic, savings-led microfinance approach that provides a safe place for poor households to save and borrow money to increase their income. It is rooted in the traditional community-based rotating savings and credit associations, that helps poor communities create sustainable, transparent and accessible savings platform that is managed by members of the group.Over the years, Caritas Nigeria has established and worked with more than 700 SILC groups in different communities across Nigeria, teaching them financial management to ensure sustainable livelihoods of beneficiaries and to address poverty which has plagued the country for many years now.

Related Items