Gambo Ali, a resident of Madagali community, who is a widow and has five children, was a petty trader before the Caritas Nigeria intervention but her business was not yielding much revenue. After the demise of her husband, life became really difficult for her, as feeding her children and sustaining the family on her petty trading business, was a huge challenge for her.
Kelly Auwal, is a mother of three children, from Wuro Patuji community of Mubi North Adamawa. She is a member of the Alheri Savings and Internal Lending Communities (SILC) group, who benefited from the financial literacy training aimed at supporting Income Generating Activities (IGA) of the beneficiaries.
Saratu Thomas is another beneficiary of the Savings and Internal Lending Communities (SILC), from Watu community in Michika Local Government Area of Adamawa State. Saratu suffers from psychological trauma, resulting from the Boko Haram attacks in her village, which led to the loss of the livelihoods of her family and all they owned.
Prior to her displacement, Martina lived in Gwoza with her household, where she traded in fresh vegetables. Upon relocating to Damare in Yola North Local Government Area, she and her household struggled to feed since they had no means of livelihood. Their attempt at farming was thwarted by flood and herdsmen attacks.
Dinatu Dauda once lived in Gwoza, Borno State with her husband, who was a small-scale farmer. Prior to the invasion of their community by Boko Haram insurgents, she eked a living from farm produce sales in a make-shift stall in front of her residence.
For several years, Sera Ezra, a 38-year-old displaced mother of five and resident of Dazala community in Madagali LGA of Adamawa State, had no viable source of income as a result of the prolonged insurgency in North-East Nigeria, which depleted livelihoods, leaving individuals and households in dire need of humanitarian assistance.
The Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MFA) project funded through Caritas Norway and implemented by Caritas Nigeria in communities affected by insurgency in Adamawa and Borno States, leverages inclusive platforms to implement interventions aimed at improving the livelihood of vulnerable households and individuals in the region
When Zara Modu, a mother of four children, lost her husband and residential apartment to the protracted insurgency in the Northeast, she had no idea how to begin life anew.
The story of 45-year-old Happy Tanko is a stirring yet inspiring one: a mother of nine female children, Happy was relishing the comfort of her amiable household, until her husband sent her away, along with their children, on the grounds that their marriage had yet to produce a male child.
Mary Idi is from Tampul community in Uba Local Government Area of Borno State. She is married and has five children. Mary had no knowledge on how to increase her income and even if she did, the capacity to diversify to other businesses was something she did not have, and as such, when the little food they cultivated got exhausted, they could barely feed.
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